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Free Resource: Task Analysis Sheet

Introduction to Task Analysis

It is important to have the right data sheets to do effective ABA! This week, we have a free task analysis sheet that you can use to teach students more complex skills such as washing hands, tying shoes, using the bathroom, etc. In short, task analysis is a strategy in ABA where a complex skill such as putting on a shirt is broken down into simple component steps (e.g., take shirt out of drawer, hold with both hands, slide over head, put one arm through, etc.). Doing so allows you to use chaining techniques to teach children complex skills one step at a time. If you want to learn more, here is a recent blog post: What is Chaining in ABA?

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Hygiene Task Analysis Download Including Brushing Teeth, Hair, Using Bathroom, and Washing Hands

This download contains example task analysis data sheets for:

  • Brushing Hair
  • Brushing Teeth
  • Washing Hands
  • Using the Bathroom

This download contains an empty task analysis template that you can fill out for your student. It includes columns for prompt level and scoring using a plus or minus for data collection. Each page contains columns to record data for two trials. 

This download contains example task analysis data sheets for:

  • Putting on a Jacket
  • Putting on Pants
  • Putting on a Shirt
  • Putting on Socks and Shoes
How To Use Our Free Task Analysis Data Sheets

The Task Analysis data sheet is divided into five columns. To use the sheet, you can follow these simple five steps (duplicated on the printable PDF as well):

  1. Write each step of the task in the “task” column.
  2. Mark today’s date above the Score (1) column.
  3. As the student completes each step, mark the score (+/-) and prompt level in columns marked (1).
  4. Total the score by dividing the number of correct answers by the total number of steps (e.g., 10/15 = 67%).
  5. You can do another trial on this same sheet and collect data using the columns marked (2).

Example of Completed Task Analysis Data Sheet

 Once a child has demonstrated mastery for a specific skill, you may no longer need to collect task analysis data. In the meantime, this sheet allows you to track progress and to make sure everyone is teaching the skill the same way.

 

Once a child has demonstrated mastery for a specific skill, you may no longer need to collect task analysis data. In the meantime, this sheet allows you to track progress and to make sure everyone is teaching the skill the same way.
 
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