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Introduction

As we discussed in our free task analysis post, task analysis is an ABA strategy for enhancing learning with more complex skills such as getting dressed. The definition of task analysis is simple: breaking a complex task into small, manageable components. When we do so, children are more likely to be able to learn complex functional skills such as brushing teeth, putting on a jacket, or washing hands. In order to create your own task analysis, you must do the task and write down each step as you do it. Make sure that you include every small step involved the task! Here is a task analysis example for eating yogurt:

  1. Finding a yogurt in the refrigerator
  2. Taking it out of the refrigerator
  3. Removing the lid from the yogurt
  4. Finding a spoon in the utensils drawer
  5. Eating the yogurt using the spoon
  6. Throwing out the empty yogurt cup
  7. Putting the dirty spoon in the dishwasher

It is amazing to realize how many steps are actually involved such a simple task as eating a yogurt! In order to save time for busy teachers, parents, and professionals, we created data sheets with completed task analyses for the following life skills:

  • Brushing Teeth
  • Brushing Hair
  • Putting on a Jacket
  • Putting on Pants
  • Putting on Shirt
  • Putting on Socks and Shoes
  • Using Bathroom
  • Washing Hands

If you are interested in purchasing these task analysis data sheets, please see the links below to completed task analyses for our two packs: getting dressed and hygiene!

How To Use

The Task Analysis data sheet is divided into five columns. To use the sheet, you can follow these simple four steps (duplicated on the printable PDF as well):

  1. Mark today’s date above the Score (1) column.
  2. As the student completes each step, mark the score (+/-) and prompt level in columns marked (1).
  3. Total the score by dividing the number of correct answers by the total number of steps (e.g., 10/15 = 67%).
  4. You can do another trial on this same sheet and collect data using the columns marked (2).

Example of Completed Data Sheet

 Once a child has demonstrated mastery for a specific skill, you may no longer need to collect task analysis data. In the meantime, this sheet allows you to track progress and to make sure everyone is teaching the skill the same way.

Once a child has demonstrated mastery for a specific skill, you may no longer need to collect task analysis data. In the meantime, this sheet allows you to track progress and to make sure everyone is teaching the skill the same way.

How To Use

The Task Analysis data sheet is divided into five columns. To use the sheet, you can follow these simple four steps (duplicated on the printable PDF as well):

  1. Mark today’s date above the Score (1) column.
  2. As the student completes each step, mark the score (+/-) and prompt level in columns marked (1).
  3. Total the score by dividing the number of correct answers by the total number of steps (e.g., 10/15 = 67%).
  4. You can do another trial on this same sheet and collect data using the columns marked (2).

Example of Completed Data Sheet

 Once a child has demonstrated mastery for a specific skill, you may no longer need to collect task analysis data. In the meantime, this sheet allows you to track progress and to make sure everyone is teaching the skill the same way.

Once a child has demonstrated mastery for a specific skill, you may no longer need to collect task analysis data. In the meantime, this sheet allows you to track progress and to make sure everyone is teaching the skill the same way.

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Anton Shcherbakov, Psy.D, BCBA

Anton Shcherbakov, Psy.D, BCBA

Dr. Anton Shcherbakov is a licensed Practicing Psychologist (NJ Lic. #35SI00592000) and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA #1-14-16071). He received his bachelor’s degree in psychology and his doctorate in clinical psychology (Psy.D) from Rutgers University. He has been working in the field of behavior analysis for over 10 years. He specializes in assessments and consultation for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder in clinic, home, and school settings. He has provided training and professional development to teachers and psychologists on topics ranging from using mindfulness for reducing stress in the classroom to management of challenging behavior. He has also presented at local and national conferences on subjects such as behavior analysis and provider attitudes towards evidence-based practice.

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